Olga’s Tablecloth

My grandmother made this small tablecloth years ago.  I inherited it, and I love it.  I wish it was in good condition, it is old and stained, the bright sun today makes it look better than it is, hiding its imperfections. I have been wanting to make a larger one for my dining room, but the thought of all those tiny motifs has kept me from attempting it.

Crochet Tablecloth

A little closer, to give you a better sense of the overall pattern.  I really like it, not too flowery or lacey.

OlgasTablecloth6

Here is a closer look so you can get a peep at the details. The photo being close up makes it look like it is done with larger thread, I think it was done with 20 or 30 thread, the motifs are quite small, I really zoomed in.

OlgasTablecloth3

Here you can see my giant motif next to it, done with Fashion 3 thread.  I am thinking I might stick with that large thread to at least make a runner, although it looks really giant right next to the original, I like it when it is off by itself.

OlgasTablecloth2

While sorting out how to make it, I decided I liked it better with the second round in the center simplified.  The following brief directions and the diagram are my adaptation of how it looks like my grandmother made it, as close as I can tell.  I have no idea where she got the pattern for this, or even how long ago she made it (she passed away about 20 years ago at 95) although I have seen similar vintage ones on the interwebs.  In a future post, I will show what progress I have made and share how I am joining these motifs together.

Olga’s Tablecloth Motif

update 7/15/14:  I have a new version of the pattern with some minor changes (effects rnd 2 only) that you might want to consider.

added 7/8/14:  Using Aunt Lydia’s Fashion 3 in white with a B-1 2.25 mm hook

Round 1:  In a sliding loop, ch5, {dc in loop, ch2} 5x.  Slpst to the 3rd of the starting ch 5.
Round 2:  Ch4, trc in the same sp.  {Ch2, dc, ch2 in ch2 sp.  3trc in top of dc} 5x.  Ch2, dc, ch2 in last ch2 sp, slpst to top of beginning ch4.
Round 3:  Ch4, trc in same sp. Trc in next stitch, 2trc in next.  {Ch7, 2trc in next st, trc in next, 2trc in the next st.} 5x.  Ch7, slpst to top of ch4.
Round 4:  Ch4, trc in the same sp. Trc in the next 3 sts, 2 trc in the last st of the group.  {Ch 4, sc around the ch7 of the previous round.  Ch3, slpst into the 2 side loops of the sc to make a picot.  Ch4, 2 trc in first st, trc in ea of next 3 sts, 2 trc in last st of the group.} 5x.  Ch 4, sc around the ch7 of the previous round.  Ch3, slpst into the 2 side loops of the sc to make a picot.  Ch 4, slpst to top of beginning ch4.  End off.

Please be advised that I wrote this directions really quickly and they may contain all sorts of errors.  If you let me know if something doesn’t seem right, I will try to clarify the directions.

OlgaTableclothDiagram2

 

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11 thoughts on “Olga’s Tablecloth

  1. Muchas gracias!!! Estoy muy feliz de poder recibir tan generosamente todos tus Mail con tan bellos trabajos a crochet. Amo el Crochet!!!!
    1000 gracias y un gran abrazo desde Chile
    María Elisa

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  2. What a beautiful pattern! I don’t think I would attempt it using a 20 or 30 thread and even using a 3 would be intimidating if making a full size tablecloth. I am in awe at the stick-to-it-ive-ness of these women of long ago…not just the numbers of motifs to make but the tiny thread!

    I look forward to seeing your progress and how you’re attaching them together. thanks for the sharing the pattern!

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  3. What a lovely lacy tablecloth made by your grandmother. Such a treasure! I love the big daisy-like pattern and how nice of your to reconstruct the pattern!

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  4. I love what you have done and admire what your grandmother did many years ago. Look forward to seeing how you progress and I may have a go with your pattern when I have finished my current project.

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  5. After viewing your close-up photo, I’d bet you could get a good deal of the stains lighten by soaking it in a moderately strong solution of an oxygenated pre-soak, then hand washing in a mild detergent. This is how I clean my husband’s dirty work caps. These new pre-soak products don’t seem to weaken the cotton fibers like bleaching does. I’ve also used this method on crocheted coasters that are stained with coffee and iced tea which worked reasonably well.

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    1. Thanks Christine! I have been too concerned about damaging it more to try anything that might actually work : ) I think I will give your method a try.

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  6. Thanks for share such a treasure from your grandmom. It is not only beautiful but also plenty of hours of love. I always think a lot while I am crocheting and I think many people do. I have kept small pieces from some ancestors and I appreciate them very much. Past is part of our present specially now we live in an hyperconsumist society, that is why I wouldn´t mind about the stained part of the tablecloth: they are the footprints of a valuable time. My best regards to you. Ana from Chile.

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  7. Have you tried joining as you go? I prefer that method with motifs, I usually get lazy in the joining if I leave it to the end. I may make a dresser scarf from this pattern i love the idea of 20 or 30 thread for it. I either like really fine thred or heavier yarn. I am strange that way I want it to take months or only two or 3 days not in between lol. Been crocheting for the past 27 years. I am now 35 years old and teaching my two daughters the art.

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    1. I prefer fine too, but my eyes have trouble seeing that now. The original my grandmother made is done with 20 or 30 thread. I might do a join as you go, I like that better usually. You could sew as you go, sew each motif as you finish it! I also like to weave ends as I go, don’t like to have to do a lot of that all at once.

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